It’s about being converted in our lives

Francis and his brothers in faith were then — and they remain today — a confirmation of how God renews the Church through a kind of gentle rebellion against the world; an uprising of personal holiness; a radical commitment to Christian poverty, chastity and obedience in service to the Church and the poor.

The Franciscan revolution of love teaches a lesson that Catholics too often forget. Rules, discipline, and fidelity to doctrine and tradition are vital to the mission of the Church. But none of them can animate or sustain Catholic life if we lack the core of what it means to be a Christian. If we really want God to renew the Church, then we need to act like it. We need to take the Gospel seriously. And that means we need to live it as a guide to our daily behavior and choices – without excuses.

Christian discipleship is not about how generous we feel, or our good intentions, or even how well we do certain religious duties. It’s about being converted in our lives according to the pattern of Jesus Christ.

~Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., Remarks at CALL (Catholic Association of Latino Leaders) Conference, Houston, Texas, Aug. 16, 2014 via Catholic Philly

 

Digging channels in a waterless land

In his book Reflections on the Psalms, C.S. Lewis says that, “In commanding us to glorify him, God is inviting us to enjoy him.” He describes our efforts at praise while on earth in this way: When we carry out our “religious duties” we are like people digging channels in a waterless land, in order that when at last the water comes it may find them ready…. There are happy moments, even now, when a trickle creeps along the dry beds; and happy souls to whom this happens often.

~ Daria Sockey, The Everyday Catholic’s Guide to the Liturgy of the Hours