Great interior freedom

They do all the good they can. They receive what their neighbor may do for them with joy and gratitude, but in great freedom, because their support is in God alone. They are untroubled by their own weaknesses, nor do they blame others for not always meeting their expectations. Reliance on God alone protects them from all disappointment. It gives them great interior freedom, which they place entirely at the service of God and their fellow men, responding to love with love.

~ Fr. Jacques Philippe, Interior Freedom

Purely out of his love for us

We need to remember that simple lesson.  The Catholic faith is not an ideology.  It’s  a romance.  It’s a love affair with God.  We’re a people who believe in Jesus Christ – not the ideas, but the person of Jesus Christ, crucified and risen for our sake purely out of his love for us.  And living the Catholic faith should be an experience of gratitude and joy that flows from a daily personal encounter with God’s son and a communal relationship with God’s people.

The deepest kind of freedom

There’s a reason the Church calls St. Francis the vir Catholicus, the exemplary Catholic man.  Francis understood that gratitude is the beginning of joy, and that joy in this world is the aroma of heaven in the next.  He reveled in the debt he owed to God for the beauty of creation, for his friends and brothers, and for every gift and suffering that came his way.  He treasured his dependence on the love of others, and returned their love with his own.  He gave away all that he had in order to gain the deepest kind of freedom – the freedom to pursue God, to share God with others, and to experience life without encumbrance or fear.

Drink to the dregs…

Know then, that God no sooner finds us resolved to attain solid virtue than He sends us trials of the severest kind. Convinced of His immense love for us and His fatherly solicitude for our spiritual advancement, we ought with gratitude to drink to the dregs of the chalice that He is pleased to offer us, confident that its beneficial character will be in proportion to its bitterness.

~Lorenzo Scupoli, The Spiritual Combat